Building 29

206 Lincoln Street, Sitka, AK 99835

Building 29 (currently the Log Cache), also known as the Tilson Building, is one of the few structures surviving from the Russian era of Alaska history.  Built in 1835, it is listed with the National Historic Landmarks. Spruce logs, sawdust insulation system, and heavy squared beams support the structure.

Castle Hill

100 Lincoln Street, Sitka, AK 99835

(Baranof Castle Site) An early stronghold of the Kiksadi clan. A succession of Russian buildings were later erected on this site. The last one, known as “Baranof’s Castle,” was erected in 1837, and perished in a fire in 1898.  On October 18, 1867, it was the site of the transfer of Alaska to the United States.  Each year, Alaska Day is still celebrated on October 18.  This historical site is managed by Alaska State Parks. National Register of Historical Places.

Japonski Island

Island adjacent to Sitka, Sitka, AK 99835

WWII headquarters for military forces who served in Sitka. During WWII, Japonski Island was connected by a man-made causeway in the 1940s to the surrounding chain of islands which served as a location for bunkers and gunning sites. Though the bunkers and sites are not well preserved, they are accessible by boat. The island was connected to Sitka by the O’Connell Bridge in 1972. Presently, it is the site of a USCG Air Station and Boat Station, University of Alaska Southeast, Mt. Edgecumbe High School, Southeast Alaska Regional Health Center, and the Rocky Gutierrez Airport.

Mariner’s Wall

231 Katlian Street, Sitka, AK 99835

Located at ANB Harbor, off of Katlian Street, this dedicated brick wall with 2,000 inscriptions represents the rich maritime history of Southeast Alaska and a special memorial to mariners.

Princess Maksoutoff’s Grave

Princess Way, Sitka, AK 99835

Located behind the Pioneer Home in the Lutheran cemetery. Princess Maksoutoff was the first wife of Alaska’s last Russian American governor, Dimitrii Maksoutoff.

Russian Block House

N Side 120 Katlian Street, Sitka, AK 99835

Replica of the block house that separated the Russian and Tlingit sections of Sitka after the Tlingits moved back into the area 20 years following the 1804 battle.  Located on the north side of the Pioneer Home on Katlian Street.

St. Michael’s Russian Orthodox Cathedral

240 Lincoln Street, Sitka, AK 99835

An important collection of Russian Orthodox art and rare church treasures. Built in 1844-48, the church was totally destroyed by fire in January of 1966. Many of the precious icons and religious objects were salvaged and are in the rebuilt structure. Summer hours: 9am – 4pm on large cruise ship days, or check posted hours on the church door; Sundays by appointment only. Winter hours: Please call (907) 747-8120 for an appointment. A $5.00 donation is requested. St. Michael’s Cathedral is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Located in the downtown area.

St. Peter’s by The Sea Episcopal Church

611 Lincoln Street, Sitka, AK 99835

Since Sitka was the capital of Territorial Alaska in 1895, it was chosen as the “See City” by Bishop Rowe. The first service was held in St. Peter’s in 1899. In 1901, St. Peter’s was chartered as Alaska’s Pro Cathedral. Located directly behind the church is the bishop’s residence, referred to as the “See House,” built in 1905 by Bishop Rowe. The church continues to be used by many for quiet and prayer, regular worship, and a place of meeting for community organizations. According to legend, Joseph of Arimathea’s staff took root and blossomed. In April of 1999, St. Peters’ by the Sea received the third planting from this Holy Thorn of Glastonbury and planted it on the church’s grounds.

Sitka Lutheran Church

224 Lincoln Street, Sitka, AK 99835

Sitka Lutheran Church is the site of the first Protestant church on the west coast of North America which contains original artifacts from the original 1843 Finnish Lutheran Church. They include a 1844 Kessler organ built specifically for the Church in Estonia, a chandelier, pulpit, and communion rail. Sitka Lutheran Church was founded in 1839-40 by “Finns” who worked for the Russian American Company in Alaska. Located on Lincoln Street in the heart of downtown Sitka. From mid-May to mid-September, Monday – Saturday, trained volunteers offer FREE tours and literature.

Sitka National Historical Park

106 Metlakatla Street, Sitka, AK 99835

This scenic 107-acre park preserves and interprets the site of a Tlingit Indian fort and the battle fought between the Russians and the Tlingits in 1804. A fine collection of Haida and Tlingit totem poles was moved there from the Louisiana Exposition in St. Louis in 1904, and in April, 1996, a locally carved totem was raised in traditional ceremonial style. The museum contains an exhibit of Tlingit and Russian artifacts. Please visit the park’s auditorium to view the fascinating historical movie depicting Sitka’s colorful and rich past.  The main building houses authentic original totems, a fine indoor museum artifact display, and an active Tlingit arts program/studio where the public can watch and talk to local Alaskan Native Indian artists.  A free, self-guided oceanside flat walking trail leads past numerous hand carved totems to the site where the Tlingit fort once stood.  Popular guided ranger walks on various topics are offered throughout the week in the summer months; please check with the park for weekly schedule. Sitka National Historical Park is listed on the National Register of Historical Places. Summer hours: 8:00am – 5:00pm daily. Winter hours: 8:00am – 5:00pm, Monday – Saturday; closed Sunday.  Trails are open from 7am – 8pm.